Figure Out Where the Knowledge Is… And Use It

Published by Mathieu Fortin

Author & Entrepreneur


1 year ago

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In a recent conversation I had with Gerard Adams, cofounder of Elite Daily, we were talking about how to find a mentor (yes, again), and I asked him what he thought were the best ways to find one.

And without bringing back all the reasons why you should get a mentor if you don’t already have one, I wanted to take a moment today to share a part of his answer with you. Because interestingly, it addresses a side of the question that we’ve never really explored—at least, not on this blog.

So, without any further ado, here’s what he told me:

“In today’s day and age, mentors are literally everywhere around you. Everybody has a talent, an expertise of some kind. And one of my mentors used to say to me: ‘You don’t have to be an expert at any one thing. You can just be an expert of experts.’

“So, based on that, what I suggest is that you research all the experts in a given field and that you start studying them. Because when you do that, it allows you to really get to understand what has made them so successful in the first place.”

In other words, find out where the knowledge is, and leverage it to build your own expertise. That’s it.

When you’re looking for a mentor, people will usually tell you to target the person you want as a mentor, and to give them a good reason to invest in you by offering them value. Of course, this is a great strategy—one that works and that’s explained in details in my book, Mentors 101.

But this is definitely not the only way to go.

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You can also study people from a distance, observe them and try to reverse engineer their success. In Mentors 101, you’ll find that Pejman Ghadimi (founder of Secret Entourage) and Sandy Forster take this idea to a whole new level.

Either way, chances are that you’re going to cut your learning curve in half. I’ve said it before; having a mentor—the right mentor—will always be a great asset to help you succeed.

Question: Which one of these two strategies have you ever used in an attempt to find a mentor? How did it work for you?

You can leave your answer in the comments below. Keep rocking!

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on LinkedIn
+



Figure Out Where the Knowledge Is… And Use It

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on LinkedIn
+

In a recent conversation I had with Gerard Adams, cofounder of Elite Daily, we were talking about how to find a mentor (yes, again), and I asked him what he thought were the best ways to find one.

And without bringing back all the reasons why you should get a mentor if you don’t already have one, I wanted to take a moment today to share a part of his answer with you. Because interestingly, it addresses a side of the question that we’ve never really explored—at least, not on this blog.

So, without any further ado, here’s what he told me:

“In today’s day and age, mentors are literally everywhere around you. Everybody has a talent, an expertise of some kind. And one of my mentors used to say to me: ‘You don’t have to be an expert at any one thing. You can just be an expert of experts.’

“So, based on that, what I suggest is that you research all the experts in a given field and that you start studying them. Because when you do that, it allows you to really get to understand what has made them so successful in the first place.”

In other words, find out where the knowledge is, and leverage it to build your own expertise. That’s it.

When you’re looking for a mentor, people will usually tell you to target the person you want as a mentor, and to give them a good reason to invest in you by offering them value. Of course, this is a great strategy—one that works and that’s explained in details in my book, Mentors 101.

But this is definitely not the only way to go.

You also may like  5 ways to prepare a successful career

You can also study people from a distance, observe them and try to reverse engineer their success. In Mentors 101, you’ll find that Pejman Ghadimi (founder of Secret Entourage) and Sandy Forster take this idea to a whole new level.

Either way, chances are that you’re going to cut your learning curve in half. I’ve said it before; having a mentor—the right mentor—will always be a great asset to help you succeed.

Question: Which one of these two strategies have you ever used in an attempt to find a mentor? How did it work for you?

You can leave your answer in the comments below. Keep rocking!

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on LinkedIn
+